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D/I

 

Discovery Report - Teen Version

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Joe  Sample

 

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Access code: TEPI-SAMPLE, completed on 2014-07-02 , Teen Extended Version 1.1, 57 pages

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Navigation Menu
 
What you will learn
What You Will Learn
Page 4
DISC Intro
DISC Introduction
Pages 5
Intro to you
Intro to You
Page 6
How others see you
How Others
See You

Page 7
Strengths and keys to growth
Your Strengths and
Keys to Growth

Page 8-9
Basic Motivational Style
Tendencies and
Motivation

Pages 10-11
Communication Style
Communication Style
Pages 12
Priorities and Decision Style
Priorities and Decision Making Style
Pages 13-14
Working with You
Working With You
Page 15
You on a team
You on a Team
Page 16
Your Graphs
Your DISC
Graphs

Pages 17
Trait Continuum
Trait
Continuum

Page 18
Relating to others
Working With
Other People

Pages 19-23
What to emphasize
When Working
With Others ...

Page 24
3 Tips to Remember
Special Tips to
Remember

Page 25
Observing Others
Personality
Clues

Page 26
Parent Section
Parent Section
Page 27-31
Teacher Section
Teacher Section
Page 32-39
Career Section
Career Section
Page 40-52
Appendix
Appendix
Pages 53-57

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Teen Section: you

Joe's Discovery Report - Teen Version

Dear Joe,

Here it is! Your Discovery Report - Teen Version! You are going to enjoy reading about yourself! This report will help you to discover some things about yourself.

This report is not meant to label you or tell you what you can or can't do. It is intended to help you understand yourself better. You will also learn more about how others tend to act and what motivates them.

As you read through this, be open-minded to explore what makes you tick. You may not agree with everything you read in the report. If you don't, that's ok. Just think about it.

Remember: This is just a way to help things make more sense in your life!

So, read on with a good attitude and have fun with this, because this report can really help you!

 

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

What you will learn ... What you will learn

what you will learn...


When you are able to ...

1) Understand yourself
2) Understand others
3) Adapt your style to theirs

then you can experience:

Better RESULTS and more success in what you do
More FUN in life and better friendships with people
More PEACE and harmony with those you care about
Better UNDERSTANDING and less frustration when working with people

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Introduction to the "DISC" Traits DISC Overview

Joe, we will be using what we call "DISC" in this report to help you understand your personality style. We use the four letters, "D," "I," "S" and "C" to talk about 4 main types of personality styles. The results of your assessment show that your personality can be described by these letters: "D/I," which is what we call your personality blend. You will learn more about your "D/I" blend and what that means in this Discovery Report - Teen Version. To help you understand what we mean when we use the letters D, I, S and C in this report, we will quickly go over how our personality model works. Most people have predictable patterns of behavior which go along with their specific personalities. There are four basic personality types. We refer to these personality types by the letters, "D," "I," "S" and "C." All 4 of these personality types blend together in you to determine your unique personality. In other words, everyone is a mixture of all 4 types of behaviors. Take a look at the picture of the DISC human behavior model below.

disc model

You will notice that there are words in bold letters around the circle which represent behavior patterns: OUTGOING, RESERVED, TASK-ORIENTED and PEOPLE-ORIENTED. Sometimes people are OUTGOING, and sometimes they are RESERVED in their behavior. Sometimes people are TASK-ORIENTED, and sometimes they are PEOPLE-ORIENTED. The four personality types are like four parts of a pie, and you can see the letters "D", "I", "S" and "C" in each of the 4 sections of the pie. We can describe the basic behavior of the four personality types using words that begin with "D", "I", "S" and "C." Some of the words are listed in the diagram above.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Congratulations, Joe
Your personality style blend is D/Iyou

 
Personality Chart for Joe

Very High


High


Mid-line


Low


Very Low

Note: This graph represents your D/I Style Blend. Please look in the Appendix section of this report to see your detailed graphs along with an explanation on how to understand your graphs.

By having a DOMINANT / INSPIRING personality style, you're a person who seeks to lead - who likes to be in charge and get results quickly! You like producing tangible results. Your strengths are in generating high energy and action to get results.

Here is your personality style blend chart on the right. At the bottom of the page, you'll notice that there are highlighted symbols which go along with your blend.

"D" is the highest on the chart. You are task-oriented and outgoing. The Exclamation Mark is your symbol. You are extremely gifted at getting tasks done quickly. By being a visionary, you achieve your goals through people.

Next, notice that in your graph, the I area is above the midline. That means your I traits will support your primary type which is D. I traits are usually where you go under stress. Consider that some short-term solutions create long-term problems.

The S and C areas in your graph are below the midline. These are blind spots in your life. Acting on these traits will accelerate your success and help you gain respect with others.

Note: This graph represents your D/I Style Blend. Please look in the Appendix section of this report to see your detailed graphs along with an explanation on how to understand your graphs.

 

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

How Others See Joe Words that best describe you

 
  • Decisive
  • Polished
  • Domineering
  • Determined
  • Involved
  • Spontaneous
  • Bold
  • Verbal
  • Competitive
  • Exaggerated
  • Ambitious
  • Independent
  • Direct
  • Driving
  • Demanding
  • Imaginative
  • Persuasive
  • Deliberate
  • Emotional
  • Impulsive
  • Enthusiastic

Please keep in mind that these words may describe you more or less depending on the situation you are in. If you feel that some of the words above describe you very well, then circle them. If you feel like some of the words do not describe you well, then just cross them out. This information is usually 95% accurate, but you are welcome to mark it up to match your unique personality style.

This report is NOT meant to label you! It is designed to HELP you UNDERSTAND and DISCover yourself.

You can enjoy your unique personality and your strengths!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Joe's Strengths strengths

The following section describes Joe's strengths based on the D/I personality blend. These strengths represent qualities resulting from blending the D, I, S and C personality traits. Remember, everyone is a unique blend of all four styles. In other words, everyone has some of each of the four major personality styles.

 

You are great at working on projects that require a leader who will take charge, have intense drive and create enthusiastic energy.


 

Determined, Energetic and Outgoing

Joe prefers to be on the go and prefers doing multiple tasks with people. Joe enjoys getting results by working with people to achieve goals. Joe looks for opportunities and is eager to get started on the next project.

 

Enthusiastic Leader:

Joe can work with others in a fast-paced environment.  Joe knows how to get people moving toward a goal.  Joe works hard and inspires others to do their best.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Joe's Keys to Growth growing

The following section describes Joe's keys to maintain balance and excellence in life based on the dynamics of the D/I personality blend. These keys are important in adapting to the needs and perspective of others. Practicing these insights will cultivate teamwork, productivity, harmony and understanding with others.

Be Patient With People

Your mindset is "let's go now!" Not everyone will want to move as fast as you do. Be patient with people who prefer to take their time.

Adjust Your Pace

Adjust your pace and energy to those you interact with. Some people respond better to high energy and some people respond better in a calm environment.

Inspire Others to Grow as Leaders

Inspire others to grow by encouraging them to take on leadership roles for future development.

Consider Your Words

Be aware of your tone and intensity level when you communicate. Most people are sensitive to HOW things are said just much as they are to WHAT is being said.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Tendencies and Motivation
for Joe tendencies and motivation

The following section describes your tendencies and motivations. We also refer to this as your "basic style" which is how you behave most naturally. Everyone has areas that he or she is strong in and areas that can be blind spots. The most natural thing in the world is for you to act in a way that feels good to you.

Please note that the following statements include areas for growth.

- As a person having a D/I style blend, you naturally act assertive, persuasive and responsive with others, because you want control, variety and at times, approval. 

- It requires more self-control for you to remain calm at times, because you are a person who likes to take action. 

- You are least comfortable when you perceive that you may face losing or being forced to conform. 

- Remember: The keys to your success are being respected by others and staying under control. Adapt to others by BEING COOPERATIVE and choosing to be SUPPORTIVE at times. 

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Joe's Tendencies and Motivation Chart

The following section shows your "Basic Style" in the form of a visual chart. The areas in BOLD show how you behave most naturally. The following section contains insights into your basic motivation and behavior.

  Dominant Inspiring Supportive Cautious
High
Trait
Behavior

Tends to act Assertive

Likes
Control

Dislikes
Losing

Guard against Anger

Tends to act
Persuasive

Likes
Approval

Dislikes
Rejection

Guard against
Placing Blame

Tends to act Patient

Likes
Routine

Dislikes
Change

Guard against
Nonparticipation

Tends to act Contemplative

Likes
Standards

Dislikes
Being Wrong

Guard against
Criticism

Low
Trait
Behavior

Tends to act Cooperative

Likes
Harmony

Dislikes
Confrontation

Guard against Indifference

Tends to act
Unemotional

Likes
Logic

Dislikes
Illogical Actions

Guard against
Suspicion

Tends to act
Responsive

Likes
Variety

Dislikes
Status Quo

Guard against
Impatience

Tends to act
Free Spirited

Likes
Non-structure

Dislikes
Conforming

Guard against
Emotion

  Dominant Inspiring Supportive Cautious

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Joe's Communication Style communication style

 

The following section describes how you tend to communicate and interact with others. Naturally, you like to communicate in a way that is most comfortable to you. Others may or may not understand you or your motivation. This page is designed to shed light on how your personality flavors the way you communicate with others. Please note that the following statements include areas for growth.

 

- Because you have a D/I style blend, you communicate forcefully and at times informally. Others can perceive you as being pushy, talkative, impatient and unorthodox - especially if they do not understand you. 

- Because you have a D/I style blend, you naturally want an environment that is results-oriented and people-oriented. 

- You typically are motivated by challenges, positive feedback and new opportunities. 

- Remember: The key to your success is to be under-control in order to get the results you desire. Do this by LISTENING more and communicating in a friendly manner with SOFTER TONES. 

 

Communication Tip: Communicate effectively and act intelligently by adapting your words and actions to the personality style of others.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Priorities and Decision Style for Joepriorities

 

The following section describes how you tend to make decisions and what tends to be important to you. Our personality style blend influences how we make decisions based on where our priorities are. This reflects our most natural behavior when faced with choices.

- Because you have a D/I style blend, your basic priorities in decision-making are power, control and people. 

- In making decisions, your focus will be on the goal. At times, you want to win the approval of others. You make decisions to be innovative and promote change. 

- You will usually decide quickly. You tend to interact with others while exploring your feelings in order to solve problems and persuade others. 

- Remember: The key to you accomplishing your goals and being respected is to base more of your decisions on FACTS, CONSISTENCY and LOGIC. 

Suggestion: Try to consider the perspective from another person's point of view, and you will make wiser decisions.

 

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Joe's Priorities and Decision Style Chart

The following section shows your "Priorities and Decision-Making Style" in the form of a visual chart. The areas in BOLD show how you tend to process decisions most naturally.

  Dominant Inspiring Supportive Cautious
High
Trait
Behavior

Your priority is Power to act

So you Decide

In order to
Solve Problems

Because you
Focus on
The Goal

Your priority is People Involvement

So you Interact

In order to
Persuade Others

Because you
Focus on
The Popular

Your priority is
Predictability

So you Seek Stability

In order to
Keep Status-Quo

Because you
Focus on
The Accepted

Your priority is Procedure

So you Seek Facts

In order to
Uphold Principles

Because you
Focus on
The Rules

Low
Trait
Behavior

Your priority is Yielding Power

So you Participate

In order to
Be a Team Player

Because you
Focus on
The Team

Your priority is less People Involvement

So you Isolate

In order to
Be Self-Persuaded

Because you
Focus on
The Logic

Your priority is Not Predictability

So you are Spontaneous

In order to
Promote Change

Because you
Focus on
The Innovation

Your priority is Not
Procedure

So you Explore Feelings

In order to
Be Expressive

Because you
Focus on
Your Feelings

  Dominant Inspiring Supportive Cautious

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Suggestions for Working with Joeworking with you

 

Based on your D/I, others can work more effectively with you by being aware of your basic style. This section is intended for others to be able to refer to in order to work more effectively with you.

 

The EASIEST way to work with Joe is to:

Use their jargon; be open; provide probability of success and effectiveness of options; give "strokes" for involvement; understand their sporadic listening skills.

 

The LEAST EFFECTIVE way to work with Joe is to:

Be redundant; ask useless questions; ramble or waste time; direct or order; assume that they have heard what you said; distract their minds from business when accomplishing tasks.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Joe as a Team Member team member

Joe, you can use this section to help you understand how you work with a "team" or group of people based on your D/I blend. Not everything we do in life involves working with a "team", but we often interact with more than 2 or 3 people at a time. The "team" can be our family in one situation, or a group of friends in another situation, for example. These insights will help you see how you tend to fit in with a team, and you can better work with them.


Joe's value on a team is:
Initiates activities, motivates others to action

Joe's ideal environment (what feels best) is: Where quick decisions are required; varied activities and roles with people

Joe's mindset when under pressure is to be: Competitive; confident; pioneering; assertive; positive; winner

Joe can be misunderstood when under pressure and be perceived as: Egotistical; nervy; demanding; controlling; aggressive; opinionated

Joe's keys to being motivated: Authority to take risks to achieve results; no close supervision; excitement and prestige; opportunity to work hard and play hard; a new challenge

Joe's keys to growing and improving: Producing tangible results through influence with people

Joe's possible "blind spots" or challenges: Short term solutions creating long term problems

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Graphs for Joe Samplegraphs

Your Environment Graph
(How People See You)
Your Basic Graph
( The Real You)


Very High




High



Avg. Above
-- Mid-line --
Avg. Below



Low



Very Low

53        81        17        54
 
71        68        23        46

Overview of Your Graphs

The graphs above show levels for your D, I, S and C personality traits. The higher the level of the trait, the stronger it is. The graph on the left is called Your Environment Graph. This graph shows how people see you. It shows how you tend to act with other people (in the environment). The graph on the right is called Your Basic Graph. This graph reflects how you see yourself. It shows how you are most comfortable acting when feeling free to be yourself. This is the graph that was used to determine your personality blend as being D/I. Keep in mind that behavior in your environment is often different than your real personality preferences. This report can give you insights into the dynamics of your personality style. You may observe that you exhibit very different personality traits in different situations. That is normal. As you learn to see the patterns in your behavior, you will be able to interact more effectively with others.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Joe's High and Low Traits

HIGH TYPE
Most  Predominant
DOMINANT
Comfortable working
in charge
INSPIRING
Comfortable working
with people
SUPPORTIVE
Comfortable working
in a routine
CAUTIOUS
Comfortable working
in a defined system
Very High
Segment
dominant
driving
demanding
ambitious
directing
pioneering
inspiring
political
persuasive
magnetic
stimulating
impulsive
supportive
passive
predictable
loyal
steady
patient
cautious
perfectionist
precise
exacting
accurate
theoretical
High
Segment
forceful
adventuresome
risk-taker
challenging
decisive
determined
trusting
enthusiastic
expressive
polished
generous
poised
faithful
enduring
persistent
cooperative
kind
relaxed
thorough
contemplative
conscientious
proper
diplomatic
tactful
Average
Segment
competitive
convincing
self-composed
charming
sociable
hopeful
amiable
reliable
stable
polite
inquisitive
sensitive
- - - - - - - - -- -- -- - - - - - - -  midline - - - - -- - - -- - - - - - - - - - - -
Average
Segment
self-effacing
hesitant
evaluates risks
open-minded
retiring
assessing
mobile
approachable
alert
self-affirmed
instinctive
self-convinced
Low
Segment
conserving
unassuming
realistic
willing
modest
peace-keeping
reflective
skeptical
factual
nonemotional
suspicious
aloof
available
eager
responsive
tense
flexible
impatient
opinionated
independent
willful
unconventional
emotional
free-spirited
Very Low
Segment
team player
avoids confrontation
humble
dependent
self-denying
participating
analytical
withdrawn
detached
probing
logical
listening
testing
changeable
energetic
reactionary
dynamic
spontaneous
uninhibited
obstinate
fearless
defiant
extremist
self-expressive
LOW
TYPE

Least
Predominant
DOMINANT
Comfortable working
on a team
INSPIRING
Comfortable working
alone
SUPPORTIVE
Comfortable working
spontaneously

CAUTIOUS
Comfortable working
instinctively

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Working with Other People Communication tips

Your Keys to Success:

Joe, when you are working with another person, it is important to remember the other person may have a different personality style than you do. Consider your possible blind spots and remember the following:

1)  Don't push.

2)  Give him or her time to process and think.

3)  Use softer tones.

 

Tip for All Personality Styles:

Remember that people tend to want YOU to work at THEIR pace according to THEIR priorities

Next, let's see how to relate to the 4 basic personality styles ...

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Working with a D-Style Person Communication with a D-style person
with someone who is primarily D (dominant)

 

Joe, because your primary style is D,

Please remember the following when communicating with a D-style person:

 

1) Emphasize opportunities, results or solutions.

2) Look at the bottom line.

3) Be businesslike and direct.

 

 

INSIGHT: Be confident and sure of yourself. Your friend may be forceful. Show strength. Be direct. Emphasize results.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Working with an I-Style Person Communication with and I-Style person
with someone who is primarily I (inspirational)

 

Joe, because your primary style is D,

Please remember the following when communicating with an I-style person:

 

1) Emphasize enjoyment and people's success with your service.

2) Look at the recognition that he or she can receive with your information.

3) Be more friendly and upbeat.

 

 

INSIGHT: Be enthusiastic and complimentary. Your friend will talk and exaggerate a lot. Listen and don't try to control the conversation or prove your point.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Working with an S-Style Person Communicaition with and S-style person
with someone who is primarily S (supportive)

 

Joe, because your primary style is D,

Please remember the following when communicating with an S-style person:

 

1) Emphasize team support.

2) Look at reliability and minimize challenges.

3) Be personable.

 

 

INSIGHT: Be sensitive. Let your friend share his or her feelings. Don't interrupt. Let your friend finish talking before your talk.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Working with a C-Style Person Communication with a C-Style person
with someone who is primarily C (cautious)

 

Joe, because your primary style is D,

Please remember the following when communicating with a C-style person:

 

1) Emphasize validating materials.

2) Look at and give time to analyze hard data.

3) Be patient and logical.

 

 

INSIGHT: Be factual and make sure of your facts. Ask for suggestions. Be open and respectful. Give details concerning problems. Be precise and methodical.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

When Working With Others ...

 

With DOMINANT (D) Style People Emphasize: With INSPIRING (I) Style People Emphasize:
  • Results
  • Opportunities
  • Solutions
  • Goals
  • Plans
  • Wise use of time
  • Leadership role
  • Authority
  • Their bold nature
  • Bottom line
  • Ownership
  • Efficiency
  • Fun
  • Enjoyment
  • Recognition
  • Dreams
  • People
  • Lifestyle
  • Energy
  • Enthusiasm
  • Their outgoing nature
  • Expectations
  • Stories
  • Success
With CAUTIOUS (C) Style People Emphasize: With SUPPORTIVE (S) Style People Emphasize:
  • Quality
  • Value
  • Logic
  • Principles
  • Honesty
  • Integrity
  • Consistency
  • Validation
  • Their inquisitive nature
  • Details
  • Loyalty
  • Correctness
  • Support
  • Reliability
  • Teamwork
  • Service
  • Peace
  • Family
  • Steadiness
  • Relationships
  • Their cooperative nature
  • Understanding
  • Security
  • Friendships
Remember: Emphasize what others are interested in!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Special Tips to Remember Tips

Dominant

If Your Style is D ... Remember

  • Don't push
  • Give people time to process and think
  • Use softer tones
Inspiring

If Your Style is I ... Remember

  • Be organized
  • Stay focused
  • Be credible

Cautious

If Your Style is C ... Remember

  • Don't overdo details
  • Remember the person, not the task
  • Smile more and lighten up a little
Supportive

If Your Style is S ... Remember

  • Be confident
  • Remember that challenges are okay
  • Don't be controlled by FEAR
    (False Evidence Appearing Real)

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Personality Clues:

Use the chart below to help you quickly identify a person's primary personality style. This can help you adapt your style to better relate to them.

 

D

I

S

C

Likes to do things Likes to do things The FAST
way
The FUN way The TRADITIONAL way The PROPER way
Personal Decor Personal Decor
Large desk, awards, useful accessories Flashy, trendy, with fun pictures Family pictures, personal mementos Aesthetically pleasing, unique, functional
Read body language Body Language
Big gestures, leans forward, advancing Expressive, friendly posture, amusing Gentle gestures, reassuring Unemotional, controlled gestures, assessing
read speech Speech Pattern
Directive tones, abrupt, interrupting, intentional Talkative, varied tones, personal, easily distracted Conversational, warm tones, friendly, prefers listening Clarifying, monotone, logical, focused, questioning
processing by asking Processes by asking
What? Who? How? Why?
strength Personal Strength
Firm Fun Friendly Factual

 

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

PARENT SECTION Parent Section
( for Joe's Parents)

The information in this section is intended to be a resource for you as you work with Joe.

The information applies to all types of relationships.

Every relationship has built-in dynamics that present some strengths and some challenges or struggles.

The next section discusses three things as you relate to Joe's strongest trait from your own strongest personality trait.

As you look in the next section, think about what personality type you are. Consider whether your own personality style tends to be more "D" (dominant), "I" (inspiring), "S" (supportive) or "C" (cautious). You may need to refer back to page 5 in this report to help you determine your main personality trait.

The next section has 4 pages that talk about how each of the 4 parenting styles may relate to Joe's primary trait. Please refer to the page that has your parenting style.

Please review this section with Joe, as it provides a guide for Joe to better work with you.

You may not be aware of some of the challenges in your relationship. This information may help you to identify possible "blind-spots" in your life.

Reading the next section is intended to help you begin to think about the dynamics involved in your relationship with Joe. When you look at this information with an open mind, it can be used to improve your relationship with Joe.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

The Dominant "D" Parenting Style
and the D Teenager

Your main style interacting withDominant

Joe, because your primary style is D ...

Remember the following when working with a Dominant D-Style parent:

 

STRENGTHS you share:

Your mutual goals, admiration, and the desire to get results can be very positive and affirming.

 

STRUGGLES you may face:

Power struggles are the most challenging. Neither of you want to back down or give up or compromise.

 

STRATEGIES for relating and conflict resolution:

Don't forces issues. Allow this person to have some choices, control and authority. Don't argue or give ultimatums. Be direct and stick to business.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

The Inspiring "I" Parenting Style
and the D Teenager

Your main style interacting withInspiring

Joe, because your primary style is D ...

Remember the following when working with an Inspiring I-Style parent:

 

STRENGTHS you share:

Both of you are fast paced. This person may desire to please you and follow your leadership.

 

STRUGGLES you may face:

Your focus on getting things done can clash with this person's desire to have fun and "take-life-as-it-comes." This person does not share your drive to complete tasks. This person's focus is on people rather than on tasks.

 

STRATEGIES for relating and conflict resolution:

Realize that this person does not usually focus on one thing; rather he or she focuses on many things. Help Inspiring (I) types finish tasks by working WITH them. Make things FUN! Allow them to talk and socialize. Be positive and willing to express approval to them. Be accepting of their expressions of emotion and feelings.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

The Supportive "S" Parenting Style
and the D Teenager

Your main style interacting withSupportive

Joe, because your primary style is D ...

Remember the following when working with a Supportive S-Style parent:

 

STRENGTHS you share:

You like to lead, and this personality type likes to follow and help. A supportive person will feel secure as long as you show controlled, stable behavior.

 

STRUGGLES you may face:

If you come on too strong, this person can feel intimidated and will take it personally. You may misunderstand this person's softhearted, easygoing nature as being "weak." That may bring hurt or rejection. Remember that this person's focus is on people, and he or she tends to be slower paced.

 

STRATEGIES for relating and conflict resolution:

Be patient and willing to spell things out, step-by step when working on tasks. Communicate in a calmer, softer manner. Relax, and do not push. Express appreciation often. Be sincere.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

The Cautious "C" Parenting Style
and the D Teenager

Your main style interacting withCautious

Joe, because your primary style is D ...

Remember the following when working with a Cautious C-Style parent:

 

STRENGTHS you share:

Both of you focus on tasks and enjoy working independently. With this person's attention to detail, you can accomplish a lot together.

 

STRUGGLES you may face:

You tend to move quickly, whereas this person likes to think things through. Your focus is to get things done now, and his or her focus is to get things done right. Your desire to control things may discourage a cautious person, because this person does not like to feel pressured.

 

STRATEGIES for relating and conflict resolution:

Do not rush or push this person. Do not criticize a cautious person. Be patient, and give him or her time to make decisions. Be willing to answer this person's questions and provide information in a polite manner. Do not expect this person to be a risk-taker like you.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

TEACHER SECTION teacher section
( for Joe's Teachers)

Dear Teacher,

We know that you care very much for your students. Thank you for taking the time to understand Joe. Care and understanding is what Joe needs in order to be receptive to your teaching. This Discovery Report - Teen Version is intended to help you understand Joe better. By reading this report, you will gain insight into the personality blend which influences everything Joe does. This Discovery Report - Teen Version will help you to adapt your teaching approach to best meet Joe's needs and to work in cooperation with Joe's style.

We would like to offer you help to determine your own unique personality style. Your teaching style is influenced by your own personality. We suggest that you start by referring to the next page for an introduction to the "DISC" traits. You may also want to obtain your own Discovery Report - Teen Version if you would like to learn more about yourself.

Just like you, we want Joe to grow to become better. We hope this information will be helpful to you in building a better relationship with Joe.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Introduction to the "DISC" Traits DISC Overview

Joe, we will be using what we call "DISC" in this report to help you understand your personality style. We use the four letters, "D," "I," "S" and "C" to talk about 4 main types of personality styles. The results of your assessment show that your personality can be described by these letters: "D/I," which is what we call your personality blend. You will learn more about your "D/I" blend and what that means in this Discovery Report - Teen Version. To help you understand what we mean when we use the letters D, I, S and C in this report, we will quickly go over how our personality model works. Most people have predictable patterns of behavior which go along with their specific personalities. There are four basic personality types. We refer to these personality types by the letters, "D," "I," "S" and "C." All 4 of these personality types blend together in you to determine your unique personality. In other words, everyone is a mixture of all 4 types of behaviors. Take a look at the picture of the DISC human behavior model below.

disc model

You will notice that there are words in bold letters around the circle which represent behavior patterns: OUTGOING, RESERVED, TASK-ORIENTED and PEOPLE-ORIENTED. Sometimes people are OUTGOING, and sometimes they are RESERVED in their behavior. Sometimes people are TASK-ORIENTED, and sometimes they are PEOPLE-ORIENTED. The four personality types are like four parts of a pie, and you can see the letters "D", "I", "S" and "C" in each of the 4 sections of the pie. We can describe the basic behavior of the four personality types using words that begin with "D", "I", "S" and "C." Some of the words are listed in the diagram above.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Teaching Insights for Joeinsights
(for someone who is primarily a Dominant style)

Communication Key - Joe says:

Encouragement Key - say to Joe:

Teaching Keys for Joe:

You can feel the strength of Joe's drive. This is a wonderful strength that will allow Joe to accomplish many great things where others may give up. As a teacher, you can help direct this strength to keep it under control. Out of control, Joe's drive can lead to challenging you and possibly resisting your instructions. This can be difficult, but Joe needs to know that you mean what you say. Show respect for Joe's choice to do what you ask. Teaching Joe to accept limits, even if they are not pleasant, is good preparation for the realities of life.

As a "High D" person, Joe may get angry when things don't go as planned, or when someone else chooses the plan. Try to remember that anger can upset Joe as much as it does you, for it is often beyond Joe's control. Allow Joe to have as much choice as you can, but do not give up the authority and control that you rightfully have in your position. When you do yield authority, you will struggle to regain the control you need to lead effectively. Joe's anger will always be a hindrance unless it is kept under control and managed properly. Joe needs to understand that failure is an event that happens, not a person. Joe may sometimes fail, but with your help, Joe will grow to accomplish amazing things!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Teacher's Guide to the
4 Main Learning Styles learning styles

 

The following 4 pages contain information on ALL FOUR possible styles of learning. Please refer to each page that corresponds to each letter in Joe's blend.


Joe's personality blend is D/I.

 

 

Learning Style Key:

D = Dominant Learner

I = Inspiring Learner

S = Supportive Learner

C = Cautious Learner

 

 

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Dominant Learners (D-types) learning styles

Strengths:

You are proud of students who, in high school, will be the school's football quarterback, captain of the basketball team, star of the drama club, editor of the school newspaper, or, in lower grades, is a school crossing guard or classroom leader. However, they often do not seem to make good grades in the traditional classroom experience, regardless of the subject. What is the problem? After all, they are smart, resourceful, gifted, and can excel at many different things. They act spontaneously and quickly and gets the task at hand done, especially when it involves physical dexterity, courage, or quick wittedness. However, when you try to get them to sit still in a formal learning situation, you may have a challenge. These students often try teachers' patience. They have to be busy doing something nearly all the time! They are goal-oriented and like to come out on top as winners. They often accomplish this by their determined, diligent, and practical independence along with a good dose of courage and efficiency. One day in the future, after proper challenge, discipline, and encouragement, they will become future entrepreneurs, explorers, high achievers or pro athletes, because they are not afraid to take risks!

Struggles:

This style of student can be very determined, which can result in conflicts with authority. In fact, conflict is just a method of interaction for them, and, sometimes, they even enjoy a little conflict. Sometimes the conflict is no more than playful sparring; however, "D" type can have a challenge being under someone else's authority. Giving them some choices and some control can help minimize conflict. Dominant Learners are often a disciplinary problem because of their strong will. They dislike restrictive routines or overly rigid structure. They like choices, to be in charge, and to be free to move and act independently. With too many restrictions and too few choices, there can be problems of anger, abrasiveness, defiance, sarcasm, and lack of consideration for others. If these students are not properly challenged, they are more prone to be defiant. Keep in mind that the challenge must appeal to them, not just to you. Their independence is often mistaken for rebellion against authority because they do not like to take orders. Work with their natural leadership ability and steer it in a positive direction. Give him or her something that they will enjoy being in charge of, and they will be less likely to try to take control of something.

Strategies:

Because this student is so doing-oriented, learning almost occurs as a by-product of energy, movement and actions. Therefore, this student needs to be challenged through a sense of competition and physical (tactile or kinesthetic) activities. Demonstrations, field trips, computer learning programs, and game format lessons are often good ways to engage this student. Since they are often poor listeners, you must give them clear instructions and achievable goals, which should be immediately rewarded when met. Also, look for ways to reward these students for the development of good study habits, good attitudes, self-discipline, and acceptable work. Getting to lead the class or a group or making choices in assignments are motivating to the "D" style. Offering the student plenty of variety and choices of learning activities is appealing to the Dominant "D" learner. Allow him or her to work on assignments with minimal supervision.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Inspiring Learners (I-types) learning styles

Strengths:

This kind of student has a strong need to be the center of attention! They like to influence others through their performance, imagination, and interaction - all of which makes them feel important through the recognition that is given to them. They often have a wide breadth of interests and are sociable and friendly. They are interested in the thoughts, feelings and experiences of others. Cooperation, compassion, and communication drive these personable students. So, consequently, they are well liked. These learners are today's visionaries and dreamers who want to make a difference in their world. Because of their high profile and popularity, you will find them involved with the Drama Club, band, cheerleading, or serving as the campus clown or a class officer. They are really high achievers who set high expectations for themselves, and who love functioning in groups of people. Consequently, they do well socially, often learning to speak and read at an early age.

Struggles:

This type of learner may not always be the "ideal" student. They are often disorganized and are not detail oriented, as evidenced by their poor study habits. Inspiring learners are great starters but poor finishers. They often lack focus and follow through. Short-term projects with lots of group activities appeal to their short attention spans and give them a payoff of prestige, playfulness, and approval, which they seek. Long-term projects can become very frustrating because inspiring learners do better in the moment in which they find themselves. A project that is due six weeks from now might as well be due six years from now. It is difficult for this learner to get focused on something that seems so far away. It is important that you, as the teacher, be verbally supportive of them in spite of this student's shorter attention span. They can often interpret rejection or failure of their work as personal rejection of themselves. Therefore, they are often fearful of competitive environments.

Strategies:

Inspiring learners are definitely interactive learners who enjoy discussion groups, brain storming activities, and group projects. They love to be involved in teamwork, and they love to give input to the group. At the same time, they appreciate a certain amount of individualism in order to be self-creative. Language arts, philosophy, history, and biography appeal to these students. They like to know about other people's ideas, contributions, and life experiences in the social sciences. Give them plenty of encouragement to participate in campus clubs and organizations, and to engage their sociability. These will also afford them opportunities for them to practice using personal planners, calendars, and other organizational tools to keep track of their commitments, assignments, and responsibilities. Also, you should encourage these students to learn the habit of carefully proof-reading their assignments for thoroughness or possible mistakes.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Supportive Learners (S-types) learning styles

Strengths:

Desiring to win the approval of adults, supportive learners are eager to learn, cooperate and obey. They sometimes go through the stigma of being the "teacher's pet." Naturally nurturing and helpful, these students are easygoing and will be quite supportive in their loyalties. They seem to flourish in a routine and predictable environment as they assimilate lessons by steady plodding or set procedures. Understanding their strong need for teamwork and cooperation will cause you not to try to put additional pressure on them to isolate themselves from their peers. They need their "personal space" in order to grow more comfortable when any changes occur. Your verbal support will help them feel more secure, especially when introducing or learning new material. They value the status quo. Because they are so steady, dependable, trustworthy, and love to help, you will often find that they are willing to help their teachers or other students. These are your naturally studious and obedient students who are a joy to the teacher!

Struggles:

Supportive learners are often sensitive and insecure. You will have to reach out and try to help them develop a sense of self-confidence. Give them opportunities to make independent decisions instead of having them confer with others. Since they are quite adept at mere memorization of data, they frequently do not see "the big picture's" underlying concepts and principles through extrapolation. Have them paraphrase lessons, reinforced with written essays to help you evaluate their understanding of the lessons. Risk taking, new adventures, confrontations, and changes in routine are often traumatizing to these kids. Give them help in learning a new meaning of adventure in their lives! Supportive learners are often poor starters on tasks. However, they can be great finishers, because they like to see closure on projects or situations.

Strategies:

The supportive learners appreciate a quiet, well organized, and structured learning environment. Lessons should be presented in sequential, incremental and evenly, slowly paced steps to play on their desire for order and proven methods of instruction. Use repetition and drills, workbooks, and written assignments, which are traditional teaching methods. Since they are motivated to understand, make sure that you give them clearly delineated responsibilities with objective standards of evaluation. Give them some open-ended assignments to promote decision making and creativity with their own ideas. You should be alert to students who have frequent questions for clarification, since this may be an indication that they are insecure or under stress in a particular learning situation.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Cautious Learners (C-types) learning styles

Strengths:

These students are natural learners. They love to investigate and understand many subjects. In a word, they simply love to learn. Critical thinking, problem solving, and analysis come naturally to these creative students. They will learn, sometimes in spite of you, because they are self-motivated, contemplative and idealistic. Cautious learners are meticulous and accurate in their work, because they value being careful, thorough and correct. They are perfectionists! These are the student with the high I.Q's. They are often placed in gifted or advanced classes. Their appetite for knowledge is insatiable and intense. They will focus on one task for an extended period of time, since they can block out distractions (unfortunately, even personal responsibilities). Cautious learners make great class treasurers or parliamentarians, and they often join the Debate team or Science Club, which offers them quality answers and value.

Struggles:

Because cautious learners can be so intensely focused on tasks, they may neglect subjects or responsibilities that lie outside their narrow frame of interest. Accountability may be needed to insure that their other responsibilities are met. Socially, these types of students can be less sociable. They can often come across as being self-centered or easily offended, thereby seeming aloof, moody, cold, or critical of others. They often relate to others in an instructional manner rather than a personal one. Help them to open up more socially and to be more accepting and empathetic towards others as they works on interpersonal skills. Cautious learners may have trouble accepting their own limitations without becoming frustrated. Give them plenty of opportunities to express their emotions tactfully. Help them to keep their personal shortcomings in perspective.

Strategies:

Since cautious learners value learning facts and empirical, objective knowledge, they constantly needs to be challenged. Mere rote memory or "busy work" will not satisfy them. They do not like being "talked down to" or made to record the entire problem solving steps that are immediately obvious to them. Give them some room for flexibility and creativity in a quiet and stable learning environment free of unnecessary interruptions, so they can work in a structured and systematic way. They respond well to the traditional lecture format and personal reading and research. You may place these students in advanced classes or allow them to proceed several levels ahead in subjects which interest them and in which they show comprehension. Cautious learners are good listeners, and they value input from mentor experts in their spheres of interest. Try to encourage them in volunteerism and service - oriented areas, such as peer mentoring, to help them develop their social skills. They usually enjoy working individually or one on one rather than in a group setting, unless the group is as interested and focused on a task as much as they are. Still, encourage them to join campus clubs and organizations, so they can both learn and contribute.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

CAREER SECTION Parent Section

The information in this next section is intended to give you an idea of various careers that are usually a good fit for each personality type.

These lists are only intended to help you with ideas!

You will probably be interested in careers from more than one list!

This information may help you think about what type of work would seem to "fit" you better. Some personality types are energized doing things that may actually "stress out" other personality types. While you may be able to do anything you put your mind to, there may be certain areas that you are more naturally inclined to excel in. In these areas, your strengths are used and your environment encourages you to be your best. You will see that there is an "exploring your interests" exercise below. Have fun with it, and give it a try. It is not meant to steer you in a particular direction but to help you think about how to best use your talents and gifts in a way that cooperates with your personality traits.

EXPLORING YOUR INTERESTS

1. Print out the list of careers for each personality style (the next 5 pages in this report).
2. On each list, write "YES" by careers that you believe would be a good fit for you.
3. On each list, write "MAYBE" by careers that that you believe may be a good fit for you.
4. On each list, write "NO" by careers that that you believe would be a poor fit for you.
5. When you have completed all of the lists, go back over your notes in order to see what did and did not appeal to you.
6. Write down your 10 MOST interesting careers on a blank sheet of paper.
7. Write down your 10 LEAST interesting careers on the same paper.
8. Lastly, write down any thoughts, observations or conclusions you had as you went through this exercise.

This exercise is just intended to be a STARTING POINT to help you begin to think about what kinds of vocations will fit you best according to your natural talents, gifts and abilities.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

"D" Styles Usually Make Good: career list

Students...!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

"I" Styles Usually Make Good: career list

Students...!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

"S" Styles Usually Make Good: career list

Students ...!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

"C" Styles Usually Make Good: career list

Students...!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Tips for Interviewing with D-Style People interviewing

This section gives you tips to remember when interviewing with a Dominant personality style such as when discussing a job, college or scholarship opportunity.

Remember that their basic motivations are:
- Challenge - Show them you have a "can-do" attitude
- Choices - Let them be in charge and follow their directions
- Control - Do not try to take over the conversation

They respond best when your approach provides them an environment where they can have:
- Freedom - Let them decide what the next step is
- Authority - Let them know that you will respect their position
- Varied activities - Find out if there is something you can DO to help
- Difficult assignments - Ask them what challenges lie ahead
- Opportunity for advancement - Talk about any progress that can be made

They will respond best to you when you:
- Provide direct answers
- Stick to business
- Stress goals
- Show confidence (but don't overdo it)
- Focus on what CAN be accomplished

Remember, the D-Style person is still learning that:
- People are important - don't be offended if they are abrasive.
- Relaxation is not a crime - know that they may be intense.
- Some procedures are necessary - ask them what they want you to do next. Repeat it back to them so that expectations are clear.
- Everyone can benefit from other successful people - don't let their strong, self-assured manner fool you.
- Verbalizing conclusions helps others understand them better - they may not give you much feedback, but don't take that as a lack of interest.

Interview Success Keys with D-Styles:

Expect challenge and debate - that is how they show interest. Remain calm, and be direct and to the point. Emphasize a goal to be achieved or the job that needs to be done and how you can do it.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Tips for Interviewing with I-Style People interviewing

This section gives you tips to remember when interviewing with an Inspiring personality style such as when discussing a job, college or scholarship opportunity.

Remember that their basic motivations are:
- Recognition - Ask them about their position and show sincere interest
- Approval - Look for their good qualities and voice them
- Popularity - Talk about ways that you can help them succeed.

They respond best when your approach provides them an environment where they can have:
- Prestige - Show them respect
- Friendly relationships - Smile and be genuinely friendly and upbeat
- Opportunities to influence others - If your discussion goes well, ask them to put in a good word for you.
- Opportunities to inspire others - Let them know if they have helped you get excited about the opportunity.
- Chances to verbalize ideas - Let them talk and recognize their ideas.

They will respond best to your leadership when you:
- Are a democratic leader and friend
- Provide social involvement outside of business
- Provide recognition of abilities
- Express interest and enthusiasm
- Create an atmosphere of excitement and interaction

Remember, the I-Style person is still learning that:
- Time must be managed - transfer your discussion into an action plan that has a deadline. Help them think this through.
- Too much optimism can be harmful - be enthusiastic, but keep things realistic.
- Listening is important - do not expect them to listen very well or very long, so be brief and upbeat without extensive details.
- Tasks must be completed, so agree on 1 or 2 actions to take.
- Accountability is imperative - let them know in a friendly way that you will follow up with them. Do not use pressure, just be friendly and helpful.

Interview Success Keys with I-Styles:

Emphasize fun and talk about people you have worked with before. They will respond mainly to your excitement and tone more than anything else, so be excited!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Tips for Interviewing with S-Style People interviewing

This section gives you tips to remember when interviewing with a Supportive personality style such as when discussing a job, college or scholarship opportunity.

Remember that their basic motivations are:
- Security - Relax, be calm and cooperative.
- Appreciation - Be warm, friendly and show proper manners at all times.
- Assurance - Ask them if they have any concerns. Listen carefully and help them to be at ease.

They respond best when your approach provides them an environment where they can have:
- An area of specialization - find out what their interests are and talk about them
- Identification with a group - show your willingness to work as a team member
- An established work pattern - respect their time and space
- Stability within a given situation - show how you can fit in with what they are doing
- A consistent, familiar environment - try to meet at a location they are familiar with

They will respond best to your leadership when you:
- Are relaxed and friendly - it puts them at ease
- Allow them to have time to adjust to changes or new ideas - be patient
- Serve them as a friend - be genuine on this point
- Allow them to move at their own pace - do not push
- Express your goals - be confident and sincere.

Remember, the S-Style person is still learning that:
- Change precedes opportunity. Their low enthusiasm does not mean lack of interest.
- Friendship isn't everything - do not make them feel obligated to you just because you are friends.
- Discipline is good - suggest what needs to be done next
- It is all right to say, "No!" - realize that they will avoid conflict at all costs, even if it means speaking as a "yes" and acting as a "no."
- Being a "servant" does not mean being a "sucker" - be careful to not ask too much of this person too soon. They may over-extend themselves to avoid disappointing you.

Interviewing Success Keys with S-Styles:

Emphasize people and security with them. Give them time to absorb your message. Be patient and nonthreatening. Use a softer, gentler tone. They respond best to a warm, genuine, friendly approach.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Tips for Interviewing with C-Style People interviewing

This section gives you tips to remember when interviewing with a Cautious personality style such as when discussing a job, college or scholarship opportunity.

Remember that their basic motivations are:
- Quality answers - Be specific and give logical answers
- Excellence - Provide examples of past accomplishments
- Value - Provide a list of benefits that you offer in the situation

They respond best when your approach provides them an environment where they can have:
- Clearly-defined tasks and explanations - speak clearly and don't get off the subject
- Sufficient time and resources to accomplish tasks - don't push them
- Team participation - expect them to want to double-check with others
- Limited risks - talk about any of their concerns
- Assignments that require planning and precision - give them whatever information they feel they need to work with you.

They will respond best to your leadership when you:
- Provide reassurance - give specific examples to back up what you are saying
- Maintain a supportive atmosphere - do not be confrontational
- Provide an open-door policy - show a willingness to consider their viewpoint
- Are very specific - do not be vague or unclear
- Are detail-oriented - stay on the subject that THEY are interested in

Remember, the C-Style person is still learning that:
- Total agreement is not always necessary - do not argue if you disagree.
- Thorough explanations are not always possible - don't be afraid to say that you do not know the answer to one of their questions. They express interest by asking questions.
- Deadlines must be met - set a deadline for any task that you ask them to do, because it is easy for them to get lost in striving for perfection.
- Taking a calculated risk can be profitable - emphasize the benefits and results they can achieve. Help them to offset any perceived risks by redirecting concerns in light of the desired results.
- There are varying degrees of excellence - realize that they tend to over-analyze everything. Do not be overwhelmed by their strong desire for information. Remain confident and patient.

Interviewing Success Keys with C-Styles:

Emphasize your qualifications and value in a logical manner. Give them reassurance that you are able to do the work at hand. Give them time to think things through and process any information you provide. They will respond best to a rational, specific and calm approach.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

D Styles: How Others Can Perceive Them Perception

 

Under Control

How you see yourself

Out of Control

How others may perceive you

Outspoken Rude
Assertive Cruel
Productive Inconsiderate
Straight-forward Detached
Goal-oriented Impatient
Confident Conceited
Competitive Ruthless
Bold Arrogant
Deliberate Dictatorial

Insights into the "D" Personality Style:

"High D" personality styles are often misunderstood. A high D who is able to adapt to the pace of others and communicate on a personal level is much more likely to maintain good relationships (which ultimately leads to more productivity). They can be intense. They tend to know 2 speeds in life - zero and full throttle. Those who work with the high D can remember not to take everything personally. While high D personality styles can be seen as being all about "getting-it-done," it is important to remember that they also have feelings and personal needs. They can be very caring, but the way they express their feelings tends to be by doing something for the ones they care for. Show the high D some respect, pick up the pace a little, and you'll make a hard-working, loyal friend!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

I Styles: How Others Can Perceive Them Perception

 

Under Control

How you see yourself

Out of Control

How others may perceive you

Friendly Weak-willed
Carefree Undisciplined
Optimistic Unrealistic
Persuasive Manipulative
Free-spirit Impulsive
Imaginative Day-dreamer
Outgoing Overactive
Communicative Self-promoter
Relational Shallow

Insights into the "I" Personality Style:

"High I" personality styles are the easiest to spot. They are expressive, interactive and engaging. They feel and outwardly express a wide range of emotions. Be open to "experience" being with them. Their world is more dramatic, their colors more intense, and they look at life through "postively enhanced" glasses. A high I who is able to adapt their behavior to be more serious when necessary will be well received and well liked. Give the high I the freedom to express themselves and try things out. They do life interactively, so engage with them, lighten up and enjoy the ride!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

S Styles: How Others Can Perceive Them Perception

 

Under Control

How you see yourself

Out of Control

How others may perceive you

Reliable Dependent
Listener Fearful
Conservative Resists Change
Quiet Unemotional
Helpful Push-over
Peaceful Passive
Cooperative Indecisive
Loyal Possessive
Softhearted Enabling

Insights into the "S" Personality Style:

"High S" personality styles tend to be very quiet, softspoken and non-assuming. Their more gentle approach can be soothing. The high S who can look at challenges in life objectively and make difficult decisions will be more able to adapt to the inevitable challenges that occur in life. S personality styles can be easy to overlook. You can hurt their feelings and never know it. They add a measure of harmony that helps to maintain a peaceful environment. Turn your intensity level down a notch when you are around a high S. Relax, have a seat and visit with them to see how they are doing.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

C Styles: How Others Can Perceive Them Perception

 

Under Control

How you see yourself

Out of Control

How others may perceive you

Observant Intrusive
Questioning Prying
Cautious Distrustful
Efficient Fixated
Orderly Compulsive
Consistent Rigid
Private Unsociable
Excellent Perfectionist
Reserved Emotionless

Insights into the "C" Personality Style:

"High C" personality styles tend to be more solitary. While high C's are reserved, they tend to act with purpose and focus when they reach a decision. In that way, a high C can come across as a high D (dominant, determined, doer) at times. A high C who can adapt their approach to life by seeing it through the eyes of other people can experience much more connection with others. Feelings are shared by high Cs only after trust is established, and that tends to take a long time. Be consistent with a high C. Getting into their personal space takes time. High C's have feelings like anyone else, but it tends to be harder to express them.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

 

 

 

 

Appendix

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Understanding Your Environment Graph

Your Environment Graph
(How People See You)
Very High
High
Midline
Low
Very Low
53        81        17        54
 
   

Your Environment Graph shows the way you have learned to function in your environment in order to achieve success. Your environment's requirements and expectations influence why you choose to act the way you do. The way you adapt to your environment can change depending on what you are going through in your life, changing role requirements, or major life-changing events. So, depending on the situation, you may respond with different personality traits to a greater or lesser extent. Therefore, your Environment Graph can vary some over time (months or years).

Your Environment Graph is based on answers you selected in the MOST category in the assessment (characteristics MOST like you). Your MOST choices are influenced by your environment. A simple illustration will explain why the Environment Graph comes from your MOST choices. What do you MOST want for dinner tonight? Pizza? Steak? A seafood salad? Your MOST choice for dinner is influenced by your environment. You might order pizza if you are in a hurry. You might choose steak to celebrate a special event. You might choose the seafood salad if you are on a diet. You make similar decisions in your behavior. You may need to be very decisive at work, so your Dominant (D) traits may score higher than they otherwise might in a more relaxed situation. Likewise, if your work requires you to be very exact and careful every day, then you would expect your Cautious (C) traits to score a little higher than they might otherwise. The more "MOST" choices you made for a given DISC type in your assessment, the higher your plotting point for that given DISC type would be in the graph.

 

 

 

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Understanding Your Basic Graph

Your Basic Graph
( The Real You)
 
Very High
High
Midline
Low
Very Low
71        68        23        46
 

Your Basic Graph shows your natural behavior. It shows how you are "wired" to behave when you are totally at ease. It is also the behavior you will gravitate to when you are under pressure, because it is the response that comes easiest to you. Your personality is built into who you are. You were designed a certain way from birth, before any outside influences occurred. Your natural personality traits vary less over time, because they are not significantly influenced by your environment.

Your Basic Graph is based on the choices you made in the LEAST category in the assessment (characteristics that were LEAST like you). Each time you made a LEAST choice for a given DISC type in your assessment, you indicated that you were least like that trait and the lower your plotting point for that trait would be. Do you remember our dinner illustration from the previous page? What if you were given the dinner choices of pizza, steak, or a seafood salad, but you hated seafood? Chances are good that you would choose seafood as your LEAST desirable choice. You probably would not change that choice, no matter where you were. You are usually very consistent in the things you do not like. Likewise, you are usually consistent in staying away from behaviors that are LEAST comfortable to you when you have a choice.

How many different graphs are there?

Some people associate DISC with only 4 personality styles. However, you are a BLEND of ALL 4 personality traits that each have their own levels. The personality assessment can yield over 39,000 possible graph combinations. The validity of these reports in a statistical study showed about eighty five to ninety percent accuracy rate. For a more in-depth discussion of DISC, or to understand your graphs more completely, please refer to the books Positive Personality Profiles and Who Do You Think You Are, Anyway? by Robert A. Rohm, Ph.D.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Terms for 'Guard Against' Responses terms

(see Tendencies and Motivation Section on pages 10-11)

The following words are used to describe behaviors that all personality styles should guard against (see the Tendencies and Motivation information on pages 10-11). Brief periods of quick reactions or out-of-control behavior are normal when a person is in a fearful situation; however, it is important to RESPOND instead of REACTING to situations. Responding allows a person to be in-control (exercise self-control). Fears may be a cause for concern, but they should not control a person.

Anger - A secondary response when you have experienced hurt or fear. Rather than getting angry, ask yourself who hurt you or what are you fearful of at the present moment. Dealing with your hurt or fear can help calm your anger.

Blame - Avoiding taking responsibility; a person can blame people or circumstances

Nonparticipation - Not engaging, no response, minimal interaction

Criticism - Not understanding the need to set realistic expectations with themselves and others

Indifference - No emotion, a person just doesn't care; no importance or value one way or the other; disinterested; unconcerned

Suspicion - Thinking that the other person has an ulterior motive or is not sincere

Impatience - Feeling a strong need for some type of action.

Emotion - Personal feelings. High C styles (cautious, calculating) may allow reason (intellect, logic) to so rule over emotion that emotion is given no value at all. Low C styles may allow emotion to rule over reason so much that they are not rational.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

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Relationship Feedback  

Relationship Feedback Report: This is a free bonus report available for any two people who have Discovery Reports. Learn to work together and relate with each other! This report will show you how! Learn More

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FREE: Team Charts: Take advantage of our free Team Composite Chart tool to get an at-a-glance view of your group. Take the mystery out of how you interact together. Great for any group that needs to work together or understand more about each other.Learn More

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Reports for Adults: We offer a full line of personality reports for adults ranging from short, concise versions to full-length versions with 50 or more pages. Learn More

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