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Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

 

Discovery Report for
Joe Sample

 

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Access code: KEPI-SAMPLE, completed 2016-09-27 , BOTS Extended Report v2.1

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Navigation Menu
 
What you will learn
Objectives of
this report

Page 3
Intro to you
Section 1 for the child
Page 4
Intro to you
Words that
describe

Page 5
Strengths and keys to growth
Strengths
Page 6
Basic Motivational Style
How to be your best
Page 7
Basic Motivational Style
Basic personality style
Page 8
Communication Style
Communication Style
Page 9
3 Tips to Remember
Remember ...
Page 10
Parent Section
Section 2 for parents
Pages 11-12
DISC Intro
What is DISC?
Page 13
Intro to you
Summary of child traits
Pages 14-16
Teacher Section
Parenting Guide
Pages 17-24
Parent Section
Section 3 for
teachers

Page 25
DISC Intro
What is DISC?
Page 26
Intro to you
Summary of child traits
Pages 27-29
Teacher Section
Teaching Guide
Pages 30-39
Observing Others
Teacher guide to 4 learning styles
Pages 40-44
Appendix
Appendix
Page 45
Your Graphs
Graphs
Pages 46-48
What to emphasize
Handy Charts and More Resources
Pages 49-50

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Objectives of this Report Words that best describe you

1) Help Joe Understand Himself

2) Help Parents Understand Joe and Adapt Their Parenting Style to Him

3) Help Teachers Understand Joe and Adapt Their Teaching Style to Him

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Section 1:
Joe's Report

Dear Joe,

We hope you enjoyed all of the BOTS stories! Now, you get to learn about yourself and your personality!

Did you know that everyone has a special personality? Everyone is different. In other words, everyone is not like you and you are not like everyone else.

Some people like to be more quiet and some people like to talk with everyone! You are about to discover some wonderful things about yourself.

One thing is for sure, you are special, and there is no one quite like you. We hope you use your talents and gifts to do good things, to help people and to be your best!

 

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Words that Best Describe Joe Words that best describe you

*   Does not give up easily 
*   Uses imagination when telling stories 
*   Is a big thinker with big goals 
*   Has a great imagination 
*   Makes decisions quickly 
*   Wants others to do what they are told right away 
*   Bold and ready to take action 
*   Wants to try new ideas right away 
*   Can convince others to do something 
*   Likes to compete and to win 
*   Able to show feelings easily 
*   Likes to talk 
*   Has enthusiasm and energy 
*   Is not afraid to speak up 
*   Good storyteller 
*   Likes to decide 
*   Ready to go any time 
*   Does things for a reason 
*   Likes to be in charge of something 
*   Likes to get involved rather than just watch 
*   Likes to be the leader 

ideaSomething to think about ...

Joe, you might like some of these words, because they sound just like you. If they sound right, please circle them. If the words don't sound quite right, then feel free to cross them out. This report is meant to help you DISCover more about your special personality!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Good Things About JoeWhat you will learn


Works Hard and Plays Hard

Joe likes to keep busy and do things with others Joe enjoys heading up group activities Joe likes doing new and different things

 

Energetic Leader

Joe likes to do a variety of things with others  Joe gets others interested and excited about doing things  Joe likes to compete and inspires others to do their best

 

ideaSomething to think about ...

Joe, have you ever thought about what you are good at? Strengths are the part of your personality that help you to do certain things very well. When you know what your strengths are, it is easier for you to think of things to do and ways to help. It is a wonderful thing to have strengths, but it is even better to use your strengths to help someone else.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Joe here is how to be your best! What you will learn

 

Be Patient With People

You have a 'let's go now!" attitude. Not everyone will want to move as fast as you do. Be patient with people who want to take their time.

Stay Calm

Because you are a person who likes to be doing things, you often get excited. Others may be more easygoing and don't get as excited. Try to be calmer when around others like this.

Some Things We Have to do Over and Over

Not all things we do will be exciting and new. Although we often feel bored, there are things we have to do over and over again so we may as well do them well and with a positive attitude.

Think About Your Words

Be aware of the way you say things. Most people are sensitive to HOW things are said just much as they are to WHAT is being said.

 

ideaSomething to think about ...

Remember, Joe, you have a wonderful personality! You are specially designed. No one is quite like you. That is what makes you so important. Keep up the good work as you try to be your best.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Joe's Basic Personality Style What you will learn

 

This page talks about your "Basic Style." This is how you like to act when you are just being yourself. Sometimes you may be different than this, and that's OK.

 

 

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Joe's Communication Style What you will learn

 

This page will tell you about your communication style - which is the way that you talk to other people. You like to talk in a way that is most comfortable to you. Others may or may not understand you or why you say the things you do. This page will help you to understand how important it is to think about the words you say AND also think about the way you say those words.

 

 

 

 

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Remember, Joe ... What you will learn

 

Joe, you have a wonderful personality!

There is no one like you. No one has your exact combination of talents and gifts. You were made special and unique. You find ways to do the impossible, and you think ahead!

To be your best, make sure you give attention and care to the people around you. You will be in charge of many important things. It's good to learn to make wise choices now. 

As you grow older, you will be a great leader. You like challenges, so let us challenge you to use your energy to help people. You will learn a lot by following the advice of your parents and teachers.  

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Section 2:
For Joe's Parents

Dear Mom or Dad,

We know that you care very much for Joe. Thank you for taking the time to understand him. Loving understanding is what Joe needs first from you. This report is intended to help you both grow closer together. By reading this report, you will gain a better understanding of Joe’s personality blend which influences everything he does. This report will help you to adapt your parenting approach to best meet Joe’s needs and to work in cooperation with his style.

We would like to offer help to you in order to gain a better understanding of your unique personality. Your parenting style is influenced by your own personality, so we encourage you to determine what your personality blend is. Please see the Appendix section of this report to learn about the DISC model of human behavior and how you can obtain your own Discovery Report.

Just like you, we want Joe to grow to become his best. Talking about Joe’s report with him can help you build a relationship that is open and honest. Enjoy growing together!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Section 2:
Important Message for Joe's Parents

You have chosen to help Joe by working with him to take the BOTS DISC profile assessment. We want to commend you for this desire and for spending this time with Joe. Use this opportunity to learn new things about him and his personality.

Understanding is what he needs first from you. You have given Joe the freedom to make selections in the BOTS assessment, and now this report is providing some feedback for you to review.

We have endeavored to develop an assessment tool using pictures and stories that allows us to determine the personality blend of the children ages 4-12. Overall, we have found that the results are usually accurate, but we fully recognize that there is room for adjustments. Naturally, the younger a student is, the less objective and predictable responses may be.

We recommend that you view the results of this report as a 'snapshot' of Joe's personality. Realize that results can vary to some degree, so these results are not to be considered conclusive. We certainly believe that these results are fairly accurate and provide a good starting point for you to approach Joe in a more effective way.

The entire experience is a learning tool for both of you. We hope you benefit from spending time trying to understand Joe. Perhaps you will think more deeply about what motivates him to behave the way he does.

Joe's self-awareness is growing as he grows, so you want to encourage that growth while also allowing for his age and maturity level. If Joe happened to makes choices in the assessment that seem to indicate who he would LIKE to be rather than who you think he REALLY IS, then it could mean that Joe needs your encouragement to recognize, accept and appreciate how special he is. In that case, simply focus on affirming him as a special young person with value and worth to you and to others and himself. Just like you, we want Joe to grow to become all that he is meant to be. Use this opportunity to help your relationship be even more open and honest.

We hope you enjoy this great opportunity to learn to relate better with Joe!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

What is DISC About? (Parent /Teacher Reference)

A diagram of the DISC personality model of human behavior is shown below. There are four main personality styles: D, I, S and C which are each represented as a quadrant in a circle. The four arrows in the diagram represent a person's preferences or orientation. Everyone has a combination of all four personality traits to a greater or lesser degree. Joe's personality blend appears on the chart below as a red circle.

 

Describing Joe Using DISC

The letters we use for Joe's personality are D/I. Here is what those letters mean ...Determined and Doer (D), and Interested in People (I). Prefers to move around and speak up, usually notices and thinks about what needs to be done, often notices and thinks about people.

By having a DETERMINED and DOER / INTERESTED in PEOPLE personality style, Joe is very active and prefers to move around and speak up! Joe likes to do things quickly. He enjoys completing any jobs he is given, but Joe also enjoys people. He likes keeping busy and being involved in different activities. Joe likes a challenge. He is good at getting a job started and good at getting others to join in.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Words that Best Describe Joe Words that best describe you

*   Does not give up easily 
*   Uses imagination when telling stories 
*   Is a big thinker with big goals 
*   Has a great imagination 
*   Makes decisions quickly 
*   Wants others to do what they are told right away 
*   Bold and ready to take action 
*   Wants to try new ideas right away 
*   Can convince others to do something 
*   Likes to compete and to win 
*   Able to show feelings easily 
*   Likes to talk 
*   Has enthusiasm and energy 
*   Is not afraid to speak up 
*   Good storyteller 
*   Likes to decide 
*   Ready to go any time 
*   Does things for a reason 
*   Likes to be in charge of something 
*   Likes to get involved rather than just watch 
*   Likes to be the leader 

ideaSomething to think about ...

Joe, you might like some of these words, because they sound just like you. If they sound right, please circle them. If the words don't sound quite right, then feel free to cross them out. This report is meant to help you DISCover more about your special personality!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Good Things About JoeWhat you will learn


Works Hard and Plays Hard

Joe likes to keep busy and do things with others Joe enjoys heading up group activities Joe likes doing new and different things

 

Energetic Leader

Joe likes to do a variety of things with others  Joe gets others interested and excited about doing things  Joe likes to compete and inspires others to do their best

 

ideaSomething to think about ...

Joe, have you ever thought about what you are good at? Strengths are the part of your personality that help you to do certain things very well. When you know what your strengths are, it is easier for you to think of things to do and ways to help. It is a wonderful thing to have strengths, but it is even better to use your strengths to help someone else.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Important Things to Know About Joe

 

Joe's Motivation for Doing Things:

Enjoys doing lots of different things


Joe's Gifts and Abilities:

Likes to do things with others


Joe's Way of Helping Others:

Is able to get things started and get others involved


Joe's Best Environment:

Fast pace with lots of different things to do


What Motivates and Encourages Joe:

Time to work hard and play hard; new and exciting things to do; keep them busy; praise their work


Personality Styles that Tend to Work Well with Joe:

S/CD, S/C, S/I, C/S 

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Suggestions for Working with Joeworking with you

 

Based on Joe's D/I blend, you can work more effectively with him by being aware of his natural style. This section is intended for you (as the Parent) to be able to refer to in order to work more effectively with Joe.

The EASIEST way to work with Joe (or anyone with the D/I blend) is to:

Keep up a fast pace; be open to their ideas; give recognition for any achievements; understand their sporadic listening skills and need to take action.

 

The LEAST EFFECTIVE way to work with Joe (or anyone with the D/I blend) is to:

Respond slowly, be redundant; ask unnecessary questions; waste time; expect to wait patiently without taking any action; ignore him or her.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Parenting Insights for Joe's "D" Traits What you will learn

Communication Key - imaging Joe saying to you ...:

Encouragement Key - say to Joe:

Parenting Keys for Joe:

You can feel the strength of Joe’s drive. This is a wonderful strength that will allow him to accomplish many great things where others may give up. As a parent you can help him keep this strength under control. Out of control, Joe’s drive will be to argue with anything you tell him to do. This can be difficult, but he needs to know that you mean what you say. Show respect for his choice to do what you ask. Teaching Joe to accept limits, even when he disagrees, prepares him for the realities of life.

As a “High D” child, Joe may get angry when things don’t go as he planned, or when someone else chooses the plan. Try to remember that anger can scare Joe as much as is does you, for it is often beyond his control. Allow Joe to have as much choice as you can, but do not allow him to take control from you. When you do, you will struggle to regain the control you need. Joe’s anger will always hinder him unless he learns to use it constructively. He needs to understand that failure is an event that happens, not a person. Joe may sometimes fail, but with your help, he will grow to accomplish amazing things!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

The Dominant "D" Parenting Guide
with a Determined 'D' Child

Dominantinteracting withYour main style

Dear Parent, if your primary style is "D" Dominant please refer to this guide in working with Joe's "D" traits:

 

STRENGTHS you share:

As long as you both share the same desires and direction, you will experience harmony, and you'll be able to accomplish a lot as a team. Your mutual goals, admiration and desire to get results can be very positive and affirming.

 

STRUGGLES you may face:

Power struggles are the most challenging. Neither of you want to back down or give up or compromise.

 

STRATEGIES for relating and conflict resolution:

Don't forces issues. Allow your child to have some choices, control and authority. Don't argue or give ultimatums. Be direct and to the point.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

The Inspiring "I" Parenting Guide
with a Determined 'D' Child

Dominantinteracting withYour main style

Dear Parent, if your primary style is "I" Inspiring please refer to this guide in working with Joe's "D" traits:

 

STRENGTHS you share:

You both are outgoing and activity-driven. Both of you like to win. You may admire the strengths and achievements of him or her.

 

STRUGGLES you may face:

You may find your child to be too controlling, while you are too permissive. You are more social, while he or she is more task-driven.

 

STRATEGIES for relating and conflict resolution:

Understand that a D-type person is direct and results-oriented. Be more direct, and get to the point with him or her. Do not be afraid of confrontation. Expect it, and do not take it personally. Work first, and THEN have fun.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

The Supportive "S" Parenting Guide
with a Determined 'D' Child

Supportiveinteracting withYour main style

Dear Parent, if your primary style is "S" Supportive please refer to this guide in working with Joe's "D" traits:

 

STRENGTHS you share:

You are a good supporter and encourager for your child who is driven and seeks to achieve and exert leadership.

 

STRUGGLES you may face:

Your child can exhaust you by being controlling or by expecting instant action. You like to relax and go slow, but he or she does everything with a sense of urgency. You can become stressed, and your child can become impatient.

 

STRATEGIES for relating and conflict resolution:

Do not take it personally when your child takes action without you. Be more firm and results-oriented with him or her. Be more direct, decisive and action-oriented.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

The Cautious "C" Parenting Guide
with a Determined 'D' Child

Cautiousinteracting withYour main style

Dear Parent, if your primary style is "C" Cautious please refer to this guide in working with Joe's "D" traits:

 

STRENGTHS you share:

Both of you share a similar bent toward accomplishing tasks. As long as you share the same goals, you can be very effective together.

 

STRUGGLES you may face:

You may have conflict if you take different approaches to accomplishing a task. You want things done "right," and your child may be focused on getting things done quickly. "Right" to the D-type is seldom complicated in his or her mind. They may think that you are over-analyzing things, while you may think that he or she is being too hasty.

 

STRATEGIES for relating and conflict resolution:

Accept the fact that the D-type child needs to have some control and the ability to take some action. Allow this child to take some risks. Do not criticize or expect perfection. Instead, be willing to recognize and affirm this D-type person's accomplishments. Try to see his or her perspective rather than arguing your point.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Understanding, Accepting and Affirming
Joe’s “D” Traits: Words that best describe you

(Dominant / Directing Traits)

Greatest Felt Needs: Control and results

Greatest Underlying Need: To be admired for getting things done

High “D” children are natural-born leaders. As a result, they are extremely strong-willed. They have an overwhelming need to be in control. Needing control is not an option but a driving force in the life of “D” children.

“Ds” think ahead, plotting for control. They will sense when parents are most vulnerable and then attack. When their parents are preoccupied with something important (for example, talking on the phone), they will take chances that they would not normally take.

“D” children will loudly and angrily declare their disapproval when things don’t go their way. Theirs is a logic-based anger, rooted in impatience.

Because “D” children say what they think, they can often hurt people’s feelings. They can be blunt, even brutal. If we realize that many times they may not be intentionally trying to hurt someone, we can more easily accept their quick comments and correct them without becoming angry. The effect on others is heightened by their inability to say, “I’m sorry.”

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Helping Joe Grow: Words that best describe you

Helping Joe based on "D" traits

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Section 3:
For Joe's Teachers

Dear Teacher,

We know that you care very much for your students and also for Joe. Thank you for taking the time to go through his report. Care and understanding is what Joe needs in order to be receptive to your teaching. This report is intended to help you understand him better.

You’ll gain insight into his personality blend that influences everything he does. This report will also help you to adapt your teaching approach to best meet Joe’s needs and to work in cooperation with his style.

We would like to offer help to you as well to gain a better understanding of your unique personality . Your teaching style is influenced by your own personality, so we encourage you to determine what your personality blend is. Please see the Appendix section of this report to learn about the DISC model of human behavior and how you can obtain your own personality report. Just like you, we want Joe to grow to become his best. Talking about Joe’s report with him can help you build a relationship that is open and honest.

Enjoy growing together!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

What is DISC About? (Parent /Teacher Reference)

A diagram of the DISC personality model of human behavior is shown below. There are four main personality styles: D, I, S and C which are each represented as a quadrant in a circle. The four arrows in the diagram represent a person's preferences or orientation. Everyone has a combination of all four personality traits to a greater or lesser degree. Joe's personality blend appears on the chart below as a red circle.

 

Describing Joe Using DISC

The letters we use for Joe's personality are D/I. Here is what those letters mean ...Determined and Doer (D), and Interested in People (I). Prefers to move around and speak up, usually notices and thinks about what needs to be done, often notices and thinks about people.

By having a DETERMINED and DOER / INTERESTED in PEOPLE personality style, Joe is very active and prefers to move around and speak up! Joe likes to do things quickly. He enjoys completing any jobs he is given, but Joe also enjoys people. He likes keeping busy and being involved in different activities. Joe likes a challenge. He is good at getting a job started and good at getting others to join in.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Words that Best Describe Joe Words that best describe you

*   Does not give up easily 
*   Uses imagination when telling stories 
*   Is a big thinker with big goals 
*   Has a great imagination 
*   Makes decisions quickly 
*   Wants others to do what they are told right away 
*   Bold and ready to take action 
*   Wants to try new ideas right away 
*   Can convince others to do something 
*   Likes to compete and to win 
*   Able to show feelings easily 
*   Likes to talk 
*   Has enthusiasm and energy 
*   Is not afraid to speak up 
*   Good storyteller 
*   Likes to decide 
*   Ready to go any time 
*   Does things for a reason 
*   Likes to be in charge of something 
*   Likes to get involved rather than just watch 
*   Likes to be the leader 

ideaSomething to think about ...

Joe, you might like some of these words, because they sound just like you. If they sound right, please circle them. If the words don't sound quite right, then feel free to cross them out. This report is meant to help you DISCover more about your special personality!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Good Things About JoeWhat you will learn


Works Hard and Plays Hard

Joe likes to keep busy and do things with others Joe enjoys heading up group activities Joe likes doing new and different things

 

Energetic Leader

Joe likes to do a variety of things with others  Joe gets others interested and excited about doing things  Joe likes to compete and inspires others to do their best

 

ideaSomething to think about ...

Joe, have you ever thought about what you are good at? Strengths are the part of your personality that help you to do certain things very well. When you know what your strengths are, it is easier for you to think of things to do and ways to help. It is a wonderful thing to have strengths, but it is even better to use your strengths to help someone else.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Important Things to Know About Joe

 

Joe's Motivation for Doing Things:

Enjoys doing lots of different things


Joe's Gifts and Abilities:

Likes to do things with others


Joe's Way of Helping Others:

Is able to get things started and get others involved


Joe's Best Environment:

Fast pace with lots of different things to do


What Motivates and Encourages Joe:

Time to work hard and play hard; new and exciting things to do; keep them busy; praise their work


Personality Styles that Tend to Work Well with Joe:

S/CD, S/C, S/I, C/S 

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Suggestions for Working with Joeworking with you

 

Based on Joe's D/I blend, you can work more effectively with him by being aware of his natural style. This section is intended for you (as the Parent) to be able to refer to in order to work more effectively with Joe.

The EASIEST way to work with Joe (or anyone with the D/I blend) is to:

Keep up a fast pace; be open to their ideas; give recognition for any achievements; understand their sporadic listening skills and need to take action.

 

The LEAST EFFECTIVE way to work with Joe (or anyone with the D/I blend) is to:

Respond slowly, be redundant; ask unnecessary questions; waste time; expect to wait patiently without taking any action; ignore him or her.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Teaching Insights for Joe's D Traits... What you will learn

Communication Key - imaging Joe saying to you ...:

Encouragement Key - say to Joe:

Teaching Keys for Joe:

You can feel the strength of Joe’s drive. This is a wonderful strength that will allow him to accomplish many great things where others may give up. As a teacher you can help him keep this strength under control. Out of control, Joe’s drive will be to argue with anything you tell him to do. This can be difficult, but he needs to know that you mean what you say. Show respect for his choice to do what you ask. Teaching Joe to accept limits, even when he disagrees, prepares him for the realities of life.

As a “High D” child, Joe may get angry or upset when things don’t go as he planned, or when someone else chooses the plan. Try to remember that anger is usually a temporary reaction for Joe that it is often beyond his control. The key is helping him learn to stay under control. Allow Joe to have as much choice as you can, but do not allow him to take control from you. When you do, you will struggle to regain the control you need. Joe’s anger will always hinder him unless he learns to use it constructively. He needs to understand that failure is an event that happens, not a person. Joe may sometimes fail, but with your encouragement, he will grow to accomplish amazing things!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Joe as a "D" Student: What you will learn

Under Pressure Joe May:

Become resistant, rebellious, strong-willed, angry, stubborn, demanding and controlling

Sources of Irritation for Joe:

  1. Intimidation and inflexibility
  2. Turmoil and disloyalty
  3. Insincerity and pride
  4. Discrimination and unfairness

To Motivate/Discipline Joe:

  1. Establish close relationship - Be friends.
  2. Emphasize need for help.
  3. Appreciate loyalty.
  4. Give him time to prepare and adjust.
  5. When disobedient, show heartfelt hurt.
  6. Don’t “rub-in” wrong actions. Show him silent disapproval.

 

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Insight #1: Joe's
"D" Personality Traits: What you will learn

Style: Dominant - Determined

Style Description: Dominant/Directing, determined, decisive, active, strong-willed, self-confident, quick with decisions and answers, takes risks, competitive, persistent, fast-paced and task-oriented

Main Features - This child…
· has a strong ego
· dares to be different
· is not afraid to take risks
· likes to be in control

Value to Group - This child…
· is results-oriented
· is motivated to get results
· is good at organizing events

Danger Zone - At times, this child…
· may appear argumentative
· oversteps authority
· can be “pushy” or impatient

Basic Goal or Motivation -
· Motivated by being a leader and taking charge, being in control
· Wants immediate results, choices, challenges and tangible rewards

Blocked goals become…Fears…
· Fears losing control and being taken advantage of by others

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Insight #2: Joe's
"D" Attitudes and Emotions: What you will learn

Joe Might Say…

Note: These kind of statements may not actually be spoken, but they can reflect the attitude of a child with strong "D" traits.

POSSIBLE Emotions and Behaviors Under Pressure…

Note: These emotions and behaviors may or may not be observed. They are just possible responses when a person with strong "D" traits is placed in a challenging situation.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Insight #3: Joe's
"D" Motivational Tips: What you will learn

Each Personality Style Has Different “Hot Buttons.”

Joe Might Say…

If “D” Children are Underachieving… Important Questions to Consider…

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Insight #4: Joe's
"D" Ideal Environment: What you will learn

Each Style has a “Comfort Zone”…

Joe Likes An Environment Where He Can Say…

Growth Areas - Teach Them To…

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Insight #5: Joe's
"D" Communication Tips: What you will learn

When talking with Joe, keep in mind that he wants the following:

Correcting Inappropriate Behavior

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Insight #6: Joe's
"D" Encouraging Statements: What you will learn

Praise That Reflects Joe’s Strengths:

Say to Joe

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Insight #7: A Word of Encouragement
about Joe What you will learn

Explaining Strengths and Weaknesses

If you parent or teach “D” type children (like Joe), you may think they argue or “fight” with you too much. But remember, they have a ton of nervous energy and are just trying to find the right direction in which to channel it! Their greatest fear is that someone will take advantage of them. They need to be allowed to make choices and to have some input and control in their “rules” and boundaries. They love to be in charge, and they like a personal challenge. Teaching them to accept limits, even when they disagree, is important. They need to develop more patience and be willing to help others more. Their tendency toward anger can hinder them unless it is used constructively. They need to remember that failure is an event, not a person.


Secret Tip for Joe to learn: “Before you can be in authority, you must first learn to be under authority.”

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

 

 

 

 

Teacher's Guide to
the 4 Learning Styles

 

 

The following 4 pages in this guide contain information on ALL FOUR possible styles of learning. Please refer to each page that corresponds to each letter in Joe's blend.

Joe's blend is D/I

 


Learning Style Key:


D = Dominant Learner

I = Inspiring Learner

C = Cautious Learner

S = Supportive Learner

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Dominant Learners

Competencies (Strengths):

You are proud of the child who, in high school, will be the school’s football quarterback, captain of the basketball team, star of the drama club, editor of the school newspaper, or, in lower grades, is a school crossing guard or classroom leader. However, these type of students often do not make good grades in the traditional classroom experience, regardless of the subject. That can be a surprise given the student's abilities. After all, they are smart, resourceful, gifted, and can excel at many different things. They act spontaneously and quickly and get the task at hand done, especially when it involves physical dexterity, courage, or quick wittedness. However when you try to get them to sit still in a formal learning situation, they can find it difficult to adapt. These students are a challenge and can often try teachers' patience. They like to be busy doing something nearly all the time! They are goal-oriented and like to come out on top as winners. They often accomplish this by their determined, diligent, and practical independence along with a good dose of courage and efficiency. One day in the future, after proper challenge, discipline, and encouragement, they will become future entrepreneurs, explorers, high achievers or pro athletes, because they are not afraid to take risks!

Conflicts (Challenges):

This kind of student has the proverbial “ants in the pants” syndrome and can have a difficult time sitting still for lectures or seat work. It may seem that they need to be constantly corrected or redirected, because they tend to be impulsive and live only for the moment. This produces a strong-willed child with a short attention span. They dislike routine or structure, but like to be free to move and act independently. They are often hyperactive and like to be in charge. In an unfavorable extreme learning environment, this character quality can often lead to feelings of frustration and even anger. Responses can seem abrasive, defiant, sarcastic, and impersonal. That is their direct nature coming out. If this student is not properly challenged, he or she can try to compensate in two ways 1) try to take over some areas or 2) completely drop their involvement. Their independence is often mistaken for rebellion against authority, because they do not like to take orders. They like to be in charge of something.

Curriculum (Program of study):

Because this student is so active, learning almost occurs as a by-product of energy, movement and actions. Therefore, this student needs to be challenged through a sense of competition and physical (tactile or kinesthetic) activities. Demonstrations, field trips, computer learning programs, and game format lessons are often good ways to engage this student. Since they are often poor listeners, you must give them clear instructions and achievable goals, which should be immediately rewarded when met. Also, look for ways to reward these students for the development of good study habits, good attitudes, self-discipline, and acceptable work. Special treats, incentive charts, colorful stickers, and short breaks between lessons (since they have difficulty sustaining an assignment for extended periods of time) all serve as additional motivations. To help the student stay focused on the task at hand, provide a quiet environment with minimum distractions. The teacher will need to display great patience and encouragement, while offering the student plenty of variety and choices of learning activities that are practical and useful.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Inspiring Learners

Competencies (Strengths):

This kind of student has a strong desire to be the center of attention! They like to influence others through their performance, imagination, and interaction - all of which makes them feel important through the recognition that is given to them. They often have a wide breadth of interests and are sociable and friendly. They are interested in the thoughts, feelings and experiences of others. Cooperation, compassion and communication drive these personable students. So, consequently, they are well liked. These learners are today’s visionaries and dreamers who want to make a difference in their world. Because of their high profile and popularity, you will find them involved with the Drama Club, band, cheerleading, or serving as the campus clown or a class officer. They are really high achievers who set high expectations for themselves, and who love functioning in groups of people. Consequently, they do well socially, often learning to speak and read at an early age.

Conflicts (Challenges):

This type of learner may not always be the “ideal” student. They can be disorganized as they are not detail-oriented. They can have poor study habits, because studying does not interest them. Inspiring learners tend to be great starters but poor finishers. They often lack focus and follow through. Short-term projects with lots of group activities appeal to their shorter attention spans and give them a payoff of prestige, playfulness, and approval, which they seek. Long-term projects can become very frustrating, because inspiring learners do better in the moment in which they find themselves. A project that is due six weeks from now might as well be due six years from now. It is difficult for this learner to get focused on something that seems so far away. It is important that you, as the teacher, be verbally supportive of them in spite of this student’s shorter attention span. They can often interpret rejection or failure of their work as personal rejection of themselves. Therefore, they are often fearful of competitive environments.

Curriculum (Program of study):

Inspiring learners are definitely interactive learners who enjoy discussion groups, brain storming activities and group projects. They love to be involved in teamwork, and they love to give input to the group. At the same time, they appreciate a certain amount of individualism in order to be self-creative. Language arts, philosophy, history, and biography appeal to these students. They like to know about other people’s ideas, contributions, and life experiences in the social sciences. Give them plenty of encouragement to participate in campus clubs and organizations, and to engage their sociability. These will also afford them opportunities to practice using personal planners, calendars, and other organizational tools to keep track of their commitments, assignments, and responsibilities. Also, you should encourage these students to learn the habit of carefully proofreading their assignments for thoroughness or possible mistakes.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Supportive Learners

Competencies (Strengths):

Desiring to win the approval of adults, supportive learners are eager to learn, cooperate and obey. They sometimes go through the stigma of being the “teacher’s pet.” Naturally nurturing and helpful, these students are easygoing and will be quite supportive in their loyalties. They seem to flourish in a routine and predictable environment, as they assimilate lessons by steady plodding or set procedures. Understanding their strong need for teamwork and cooperation will cause you not to try to put additional pressure on them to isolate themselves from their peers. However, they need their “personal space” in order to grow more comfortable when any changes occur. Your verbal support will help them feel more secure, especially when introducing or learning new material. They value the status quo. Because they are so steady, dependable, trustworthy, and love to help, you will often find them serving as the teacher’s assistant or monitor, the class secretary, or even as a peer mentor. These are your naturally studious and obedient students who are a joy to the teacher!

Conflicts (Challenges):

Supportive learners are often sensitive and insecure. You will have to reach out and try to help them develop a sense of self-confidence. Give them opportunities to make independent decisions instead of having them confer with others. Since they are quite adept at mere memorization of data, they frequently do not see “the big picture’s” underlying concepts and principles through extrapolation. Have them paraphrase lessons, reinforced with written essays to help you evaluate their understanding of the lessons. Risk taking, new adventures, confrontations, and changes in routine are often traumatizing to these kids. Give them help in learning a new meaning of adventure in their lives! Supportive learners are often poor starters on tasks. However, they can be great finishers, because they like to see closure on projects or situations.

Curriculum (Program of study):

The supportive learners appreciate a quiet, well organized, and structured learning environment. Lessons should be presented in sequential, incremental and evenly, slowly paced steps to play on their desire for order and proven methods of instruction. Use repetition and drills, workbooks, and written assignments, which are traditional teaching methods. Since they are motivated to understand, make sure that you give them clearly delineated responsibilities with objective standards of evaluation. Give them some open-ended assignments to promote decision making and creativity with their own ideas. You should be alert to the student who has frequent questions for clarification, since this may be an indication that he or she is insecure or under stress in a particular learning situation.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Cautious Learners

Competencies (Strengths):

Has anyone ever suggested that your child seems like a bookworm, a nerd, or worse yet, a geek?! These type of students always seem to have their noses buried in a book, because they love to investigate and understand. In a word, they simply love to learn. Critical thinking, problem solving, and analysis come naturally to these creative and critical thinkers. They will learn, sometimes in spite of you, because they are self-motivated, contemplative and idealistic. Cautious learners are meticulous and accurate in their work, because they value being careful, thorough and correct. They are perfectionists! These are the kids with the high I.Q’s. They are often placed in gifted or advanced classes. Their appetite for knowledge is insatiable and intense. They will focus on one task for an extended period of time, since they can block out distractions (unfortunately, even personal responsibilities). Cautious learners make great class treasurers or parliamentarians, and they often join the Debate team or Science Club, which offers them quality answers and value.

Conflicts (Challenges):

Because this cautious learners can be so intensely focused on a task, they may neglect subjects or responsibilities that lie outside their narrow frame of interest. Accountability may be needed to insure that their other responsibilities are met. Socially, these students can seem downright unsociable. They can often be self-centered or easily offended, thereby seeming aloof, moody, cold or critical of others. They often relate to others in an instructional manner rather than a personal one. Help them to open up more socially and to be more accepting and empathetic towards others as they work on interpersonal skills. Cautious learners may have trouble accepting their own limitations without becoming frustrated. Give them plenty of opportunities to express their emotions tactfully. Help them to keep their personal shortcomings in perspective.

Curriculum (Program of study):

Since cautious learners value learning facts and empirical, objective knowledge, they constantly need to be challenged. Mere rote memory or “busy work” will not satisfy them. They do not like being “talked down to” or made to record the entire problem-solving steps that are immediately obvious to them. Give them some room for flexibility and creativity in a quiet and stable learning environment free of unnecessary interruptions, so they can work in a structured and systematic way. They respond well to the traditional lecture format and personal reading and research. You may place these students in advanced classes or allow them to proceed several levels ahead in subjects which interest them and in which they show comprehension. Cautious learners are good listeners, and they value input from mentor experts in their spheres of interest. Try to encourage them in volunteerism and service - oriented areas, such as peer mentoring, to help them develop their social skills. They usually enjoy working individually or one on one rather than in a group setting, unless the group is as interested and focused on a task as much as they are. Still, encourage them to join campus clubs and organizations, so they can both learn and contribute.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix

 

 

 

 

This section contains Joe's personality graphs as well as some reference charts

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Personality Graphs for Joe Words that best describe you

Your Environment Graph
How People See You
Your Basic Personality Graph
How You See Yourself


Very High




High



Avg. Above
-- Mid-line --
Avg. Below



Low



Very Low

Understanding the Graphs

The graphs above show levels for Joe's D, I, S and C personality traits. The higher the level of the trait, the stronger it is. The graph on the left is called Your Environment Graph - How People See You. This is how Joe tends to act with other people (in the environment). The graph on the right is called Your Basic Personality Graph - How You See Yourself. This graph shows how Joe is most comfortable acting when feeling free and at ease. This is the graph that was used to determine Joe's personality blend as D/I.

Keep in mind that children often "try on" different behaviors as they develop. This report can give you insights into the dynamics of Joe's personality style. You may observe that Joe exhibits very different personality traits in different situations. That is normal. As you learn to see the patterns in the behavior, you will be able to interact more effectively. We hope that you have enjoyed reading Joe's report and that this will be a handy tool to help you learn and grow in your relationship!

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Understanding Your Environment Graph

Your Environment Graph
(How People See You)
Very High




High



Avg. Above
Midline
Avg. Below



Low




Very Low
53        81        17        54
 
   

Your Environment Graph shows the way you have learned to function in your environment in order to achieve success. Your environment's requirements and expectations influence why you choose to act the way you do. The way you adapt to your environment can change depending on what you are going through in your life, changing role requirements, or major life-changing events. So, depending on the situation, you may respond with different personality traits to a greater or lesser extent. Therefore, your Environment Graph can vary some over time (months or years).

Your Environment Graph is based on answers you selected in the MOST category in the assessment (characteristics MOST like you). Your MOST choices are influenced by your environment. A simple illustration will explain why the Environment Graph comes from your MOST choices. What do you MOST want for dinner tonight? Pizza? Steak? A seafood salad? Your MOST choice for dinner is influenced by your environment. You might order pizza if you are in a hurry. You might choose steak to celebrate a special event. You might choose the seafood salad if you are on a diet. You make similar decisions in your behavior. You may need to be very decisive at work, so your Dominant (D) traits may score higher than they otherwise might in a more relaxed situation. Likewise, if your work requires you to be very exact and careful every day, then you would expect your Cautious (C) traits to score a little higher than they might otherwise. The more "MOST" choices you made for a given DISC type in your assessment, the higher your plotting point for that given DISC type would be in the graph.

 

 

 

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Understanding Your Basic Personality Graph

Your Basic Graph
( The Real You)
 
Very High




High



Avg. Above
Midline
Avg. Below



Low




Very Low
71        68        23        46
 

Your Basic Graph shows your natural behavior. It shows how you are "wired" to behave when you are totally at ease. It is also the behavior you will gravitate to when you are under pressure, because it is the response that comes easiest to you. Your personality is built into who you are. You were designed a certain way from birth, before any outside influences occurred. Your natural personality traits vary less over time, because they are not significantly influenced by your environment.

Your Basic Graph is based on the choices you made in the LEAST category in the assessment (characteristics that were LEAST like you). Each time you made a LEAST choice for a given DISC type in your assessment, you indicated that you were least like that trait and the lower your plotting point for that trait would be. Do you remember our dinner illustration from the previous page? What if you were given the dinner choices of pizza, steak, or a seafood salad, but you hated seafood? Chances are good that you would choose seafood as your LEAST desirable choice. You probably would not change that choice, no matter where you were. You are usually very consistent in the things you do not like. Likewise, you are usually consistent in staying away from behaviors that are LEAST comfortable to you when you have a choice.

 

How many different graphs are there?

Some people associate DISC with only 4 personality styles. However, you are a BLEND of ALL 4 personality traits that each have their own levels. The personality assessment can yield over 39,000 possible graph combinations. The validity of these reports in a statistical study showed about eighty five to ninety percent accuracy rate. For a more in-depth discussion of DISC, or to understand your graphs more completely, please refer to the books Positive Personality Profiles and Who Do You Think You Are, Anyway? by Robert A. Rohm, Ph.D.

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Reading Others - What to Observe

Use the chart below to help you quickly identify a person's primary personality style.

Observation

D

I

S

C

Likes to do things Likes to do things The FAST
way
The FUN way The TRADITIONAL way The PROPER way
Personal Decor Personal Decor
Large desk, awards, useful accessories Flashy, trendy, with fun pictures Family pictures, personal mementos Aesthetically pleasing, unique, functional
Read body language Body Language
Big gestures, leans forward, advancing Expressive, friendly posture, amusing Gentle gestures, reassuring Unemotional, controlled gestures, assessing
read speech Speech Pattern
Directive tones, abrupt, interrupting, intentional Talkative, varied tones, personal, easily distracted Conversational, warm tones, friendly, prefers listening Clarifying, monotone, logical, focused, questioning
processing by asking Processes by asking
What? Who? How? Why?
strength Personal Strength
Firm Fun Friendly Factual

 

 

Your ReportJoe Sample
D/I

Review of DISC Traits

Inspiring - IDominant - D

Outgoing

Style: DOMINANT, Determined
Style: INSPIRING, Influencing
Main Features: Good problem solver; risk taker; strong ego; self-starter; goal oriented
Main Features: Outgoing; talkative; enthusiastic; impulsive; persuasive; optimistic
Value to Group: Good motivator; good at organizing events; high value on time; results-oriented
Value to Group: Good encourager; good sense of humor; peacemaker; creative problem solver
Danger Zones: Argumentative; does
not like routine; oversteps authority at
times; can be pushy
Danger Zones: Inattentive to detail; prefers popularity to doing right; "convenient" listener; disorganized
Greatest Fear: Someone taking
advantage of them
Greatest Fear: Rejection; loss of
social approval

Task-Oriented

People-Oriented

Style: CAUTIOUS, Correct
Style: SUPPORTIVE, Steady
Main Features: Thinks things
through; accurate; high standards; careful; systematic; precise
Main Features: Warm; friendly;
understanding; patient; easygoing; good follow-through
Value to Group: Good organizer;
follows directions; even-tempered; clarifies situation well
Value to Group: Good listener; team player; loyal; reliable; dependable; works well under authority
Danger Zones: Finds fault easily; so focused on detail may miss big picture; too critical
Danger Zones: Resistant to change; "stuffs it" inside; difficult establishing priorities; sometimes oversensitive
Greatest Fear: Criticism of their work and effort
Greatest Fear: Loss of security and stability

Cautious - CSupportive - SReserved